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Home > Your Health > Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy > Obstetrics Physiotherapy > Common Pregnancy Related Aches, Pains and Concerns

Common Pregnancy Related Aches, Pains and Concerns

You can use the following sections to find advice and exercises to help you manage different pregnancy related aches and pains.

Inside each section, you fill find instructions on how to contact the physiotherapy department if required.

For any general questions, please visit the obstetrics physiotherapy site for all the contact details.

Pregnancy related Pelvic Girdle Pain

Pregnancy related Pelvic Girdle Pain is pain experienced during pregnancy or in the early post-natal period around pubic bone, groin, buttocks, hips and/or lower back.

Use the links below for advice on Pregnancy related Pelvic Girdle Pain (PPGP):

External Resources

PGP Leaflet: https://pogp.csp.org.uk/publications/pregnancy-related-pelvic-girdle-pain-mothers-be-and-new-mothers

Working from Home – Advice and Exercises: https://www.csp.org.uk/publications/do-you-sit-desk-all-day-leaflets 

Reproduced with permission of Pelvic Obstetric and Gynaecological Physiotherapy (pogp.csp.org.uk) and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (csp.org.uk). 

NHS Highland Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercise Information Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v731EXFR2k4

Getting in touch

Please contact your obstetrics physiotherapy department  if your symptoms get worse or don’t improve with the above advice and exercises. You can contact the department during pregnancy and up to six weeks after giving birth.

You can request to attend one of our online Pelvic Girdle Pain classes. See more information here.

Pregnancy Related Low Back Pain

Pregnancy related Low Back Pain is pain experienced during pregnancy or in the early post-natal period around the bottom of your back. If you have pain in other areas around your back, this information will also be useful.

Use the links below for advice on low back pain during pregnancy or after having a baby:

External Resources

Please contact your obstetrics physiotherapy department  if your symptoms get worse or don’t improve with the above advice and exercises. You can contact the department during pregnancy and up to six weeks after giving birth.

Diastasis Rectus Abdominus Muscles

Diastasis Rectus Abdominus is the normal widening of your tummy muscles during pregnancy to accommodate your growing baby. After having your baby, this widening can take up to a year to recover, however, sometimes it can take longer and you may require a specialist physiotherapist to review them for you.

Use the links below for advice on Diastasis Rectus Abdominus Muscles or DRAM.

External Resources

Please contact your obstetrics physiotherapy department if you have any further concerns with your abdominal muscles or are interested in starting an exercise program. You can contact the department during pregnancy and up to six weeks after giving birth.

Bladder, Bowel and Pelvic Floor Concerns

Use the links below for advice on bladder, bowel and/or pelvic floor concerns:

Please use the following Relaxation Video to use alongside pelvic floor relaxation.

External Resources

Continence Information Leaflet

Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises Information Leaflet

Pelvic Organ Prolapse Leaflet

Bowel Function Leaflet

NHS Highland Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercise Information Video

SqueezyApp for Information Leaflets and Videos on Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises

Reproduced with permission of Pelvic Obstetric and Gynaecological Physiotherapy (pogp.csp.org.uk) and SqueezyApp.com

Please contact your obstetrics physiotherapy department if your symptoms get worse or don’t improve with the above advice and exercises. You can contact the department throughout pregnancy and up to twelve weeks post natal.

Coccydynia

Coccydynia or tailbone pain is pain experienced on the sitting bone, specially when sitting. This can appear during pregnancy or in the early post-natal period due to the changes happening to your body.

Use the links below for advice about coccydynia or tailbone pain:

External Resources

Working from Home – Advice and Exercises

Reproduced with permission of Pelvic Obstetric and Gynaecological Physiotherapy (pogp.csp.org.uk) and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (csp.org.uk). 

Please contact your obstetrics physiotherapy department  if your symptoms get worse or don’t improve with the above advice and exercises. You can contact the department during pregnancy and up to six weeks after giving birth.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is pain, numbness, pins and needles and tingling of the fingers and hand(s). There may be also swelling of the hands and you might feel your hands are clumsy, weak and tire easily. This can appear during pregnancy or in the early post-natal period due to the changes happening to your body.

Use the links below for advice on how to manage carpal tunnel syndrome:

Wrist Splint Size Guide

Reference to measure wrist splint size

Please contact your obstetrics physiotherapy department if your symptoms get worse or don’t improve with the above advice and exercises. You can contact the department during pregnancy and up to six weeks after giving birth.

DeQuervains Synovitis

DeQuervains Synovitis is pain on the base of the thumb, swelling and reduced movement. This can appear during pregnancy or in the early post-natal period due to the changes happening to your body.

Use the links below for advice on how to manage DeQuervains Synovitis:

Thumb Spica Size Guide

Reference to measure thumb spica size

Please contact your obstetrics physiotherapy department if your symptoms get worse or don’t improve with the above advice and exercises. You can contact the department during pregnancy and up to six weeks after giving birth.