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Mental Health Improvement

The Equality Act 2010 provides a legal framework to protect the rights of individuals and advance opportunity for all. There are 9 protected characteristics which makes it against the law to discriminate against someone because of; age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage, and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, and sexual orientation.

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde has a legal obligation to pay due regard to meet the need to;

  • Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation, and other conduct prohibited by the Act.
  • Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.
  • Foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.

These three elements are referred to as the three ‘needs’ of the general equality duty.

Stephanie Kirkham, Equalities and Fairer Scotland Lead and Dr Janaka Jayawickrama Associate Professor of Health and Wellbeing, University of York have jointly wrote a strategic discussion paper in order to gain a deeper understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on Equalities and Mental Health.  

The Strategic Discussion Paper – Crises as Growth and Opportunities- Understanding Equalities in Mental Health and Wellbeing During and After COVID 19 is the full paper. 

What is Self-Harm?

Self-harm is an act that is intended to cause injury to one-self but which is not intended to result in death. It is often described by those who self-harm as a way of coping with emotional pain and of surviving distressing experiences. It is not a suicide attempt.

Prevalence and Incidence

It is impossible to provide a definitive picture of self-harm in Scotland for a number of reasons including that self-harm is often not reported or recorded.

What are we doing to support those using self-harm as a coping strategy?

The NHSGGC Self Harm Forum is a group of trainers who have successfully completed the ‘What’s the Harm’ Train the Trainer course, the organisations they represent, people with lived experience, and wider individuals and organisations with a shared interest in supporting the purpose and remit of the group. The forum reports to the NHSGGC Suicide Prevention Group and local structures as required.

Our Self Harm Awareness and Skills Training Resource: What’s The Harm, seeks to standardise understanding of and responses to self-harm when used as a coping strategy. It has been informed by a wide range of existing work on self-harm from services supporting people who self-harm, research teams and those with lived experience of self-harm. The training recognises self-harm as a coping strategy, a response to distress and a means to keep living. It makes the distinction therefore between suicide and self-harm whilst recognising that there are links between the two.

The NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Self-Harm forum have collated a range of information into a comprehensive resource for staff providing support and advice to people who may be self-harming.  

Responding to Self Harm During COVID-19

Read our snapshot summary of how the NHSGGC Self Harm responded to self-harm in the absence of face-to-face training during the pandemic.

Below is a suite of resources that have been developed in recognition of the current context of COVID-19 and its impact on the public in terms of possible increases in both mental health concerns and numbers of people experiencing increased distress and/or suicidal thoughts.

The resources include a leaflet and poster aimed at the public and an ‘ALERT’ pathway briefing and prompt sheet for use by staff in health, social care, and helpline situations. To accompany this there is also a resource directory of mental health support organisations for use by staff.

Helpful Resources

Suicide ALERT Pathway Brief

Coping with Suicidal Thoughts Leaflet

Help with Suicidal Thoughts Poster

Short Suicide ALERT Brief

Useful Mental Health Helplines and Websites

Infant and Maternal Health

Perinatal refers to the period during pregnancy and up to one year after the baby is born. During this period new and expectant parents (mums, dads, partners) can experience issues with their mental health also known as perinatal mental health problems. This includes mental illness existing before pregnancy, as well as illnesses that develop for the first time, or are greatly exacerbated in the perinatal period. These illnesses can be mild, moderate or severe, requiring different kinds of care or treatment.

Why Perinatal Mental Health?

Becoming a parent is often portrayed as a joyous time, however for many the reality is very different with reports showing that 1 in 5 women and 1 in 10 men are affected by mental health problems during pregnancy and the first year after birth. The stigma and fear associated with perinatal mental health can leave those affected feeling inadequate as a parent, isolated and vulnerable and can impede or delay getting help, treatment and recovery.

What are we Doing to Support Perinatal Mental Health?

What are we Doing to Support Perinatal Mental Health?

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Mental Health Improvement Team have established a Perinatal Mental Health network that is taking a lead role in translating national policy drivers into meaningful local actions.  The group meet quarterly to plan work to ensure effective use of resources, avoid duplication, share examples of good practice and report developments and progress back to NHSGGC Implementation Group. For information on our Perinatal Mental Health network please contact michelle.guthrie@ggc.scot.nhs.uk

Translating Strategy into Action

Read how our NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Perinatal Mental Health Network are translating recommendations from the Delivering Effective Services: Needs Assessment and Service Recommendations for Specialist and Universal Perinatal Mental Health Services (2018) into local action. 

Perinatal Mental Health Resources

There are a range of resources to support staff and anyone working with new and expectant parents to have conversations about mental health during the perinatal period and signpost to supports and resources appropriate to their needs.  

Perinatal Mental Health Best Practice Guide

This Best Practice Resource is intended to support Health Care Workers, Third Sector Partners, and any community organisations that are in contact with, supporting and/or working with new and expectant parents. 

Staff Prevention and Early Intervention Guide

The NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Perinatal Mental Health Network have developed a Prevention and Early Intervention Guide and a Q&A document to support staff to have conversations with parents about their mental health during the perinatal period and signpost to supports appropriate to their needs to avert a mental health crisis from developing.

Inspiring Scotland Digital Directory

The Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Service Directory provides information on Third Sector Perinatal Mental Health Services for midwives, health visitors, and families across Scotland. 

Perinatal Mental Health Posters

A series of posters have been developed by Public Health Scotland targeting mums, partners and staff to help raise awareness of mental health during the perinatal period along with supporting animations.

NHS Pregnancy Poster 1

NHS Pregnancy Poster 2

NHS Pregnancy Poster 3

Mental Health Pregnancy During After Pregnancy

Mental Health Pregnancy Partners Dads

Mental Health Pregnancy Staff

Mental Health Pregnancy Animation Combined

If you have any comments or feedback relating to these resources, please contact Carly Grant at carly.grant@nhs.net

Understanding Paternal Mental Health

We have also been working in partnership with Fathers Network Scotland to “Build Capacity across Greater Glasgow and Clyde”. Find out more about the work we have been doing here.

Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Network

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Mental Health Improvement Team have established a Perinatal and Infant Mental Health network that is taking a lead role in translating national policy drivers into meaningful local actions. The group meets quarterly to plan work to ensure effective use of resources, avoid duplication, share examples of good practice and report developments and progress back to NHSGGC Implementation Group. For information on our Perinatal and Infant Mental Health network please contact michelle.guthrie@ggc.scot.nhs.uk 

Partners
Useful Reading

From Bumps to Bundles: a research paper exploring Perinatal Mental Health in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.

National Picture

Delivering Effective Services: Needs Assessment and Services Recommendations for Specialist and Universal Perinatal Mental Health Services

This report draws on the findings of the Perinatal Mental Health Network’s NHS board visits, professionals’ workshops and online survey of women’s views conducted in 2017-18 and the existing evidence base on service provision, to make recommendations on what services Scotland should develop to meet the needs of mothers with mental ill health, their infants, partners and families.

Peer Support in Perinatal Mental Health: Review of Evidence and Provision in Scotland (Internship Project Report). This report provides information on research and evidence about perinatal peer support, existing practice in Scotland and potential areas for future development.

Perinatal Mental Health Curricular Framework

Produced by NHS Education for Scotland, a framework for maternal and infant mental health.

Despite supportive policy within Scotland, the experience of people with mental health issues in our communities remains poor. Mental health-related stigma and discrimination occurs not only within health and social care, but also within financial inclusion, employability, and education. This is in the context of the social determinants of health and equality issues predominantly amongst those with protected characteristics.

According to research by See Me, more than two-thirds (71%) of people with mental health problems in Scotland experience stigma and discrimination. In addition, 1 in 3 young people in every classroom will experience a mental health problem, and 3 in 4 say that they fear the reaction of their friends.

The impact of stigma and discrimination can be wide-ranging, including making someone’s mental health problems worse and stopping them from getting support. To find out more about stigma and discrimination, you can access our Healthy Minds awareness-raising resource.

Anti-stigma Fund

The NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Healthy Minds Network have a membership that includes a wide range of partners across Statutory and Third sectors, and is supported by the Mental Health Improvement Team. The Network would like to invite creative bids from organisations to help address some of the issues that surround mental health stigma and discrimination. This year, we particularly welcome bids that look at reducing the stigma and discrimination among ethnic minority communities, or general mental health stigma and discrimination.

The types of approaches that we have received in the past include training, research, awareness-raising work, resource development, and face-to-face activities. Please note, this list is not exhaustive and we welcome other approaches that are not included. We particularly encourage bids that demonstrate innovative thinking. To find out more about projects that have received funding in the past, you can read our Glasgow City-based case study.

We welcome bids from statutory or voluntary sector organisations working across Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Funding of up to £5,000 can be applied for.

Organisations must submit an application by the closing date of Friday 9th September, 2022. Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their submission by Friday 23rd September 2022. Decisions of the scoring panel will be final and correspondence will not be entered into in relation to unsuccessful bids.

Q&A Information Session

We will be holding an online Q&A before the submission is due. The Q&A will be facilitated by the Mental Health Improvement Team at NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, and will run from 1.00 – 2.00 pm on Wednesday 31st September, 2022. It will be available to anyone who is interested in submitting an application. During the Q&A, we will provide an overview of what we are looking for, and provide a space to answer any questions ahead of the full submission. To join the session, please email the Mental Health Improvement team on ggc.mhead@ggc.scot.nhs.uk.

Application

To apply to the anti-stigma small bids invite, please download and complete the application form below by no later than noon on Friday the 9th September, 2022. It should be completed and returned to the Mental Health Improvement team by email at ggc.mhead@ggc.scot.nhs.uk 

Anti-Stigma Small Bid Application Form

Please email the team at ggc.mhead@ggc.scot.nhs.uk with any questions on the Fund.

Scotland’s 10-year Mental Health Strategy (2017-2027) and Suicide Prevention Action Plan: Every Life Matters (2018) both put a strong emphasis on the importance of training and building capacity across the Scottish Workforce to promote positive mental health and well being.

NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde (GGC) and its partners are working together to ensure we meet these strategic outcomes via our Board’s 5 Year Mental Health Strategy. It recognises the importance of ensuring staff working with people across GGC are equipped and confident to support and promote positive mental health and wellbeing.

We offer a range of mental health training and capacity building across Greater Glasgow and Clyde, including an annual capacity-building programme, our Healthy Minds Awareness Raising Sessions, and a programme of mental health improvement related sessions that are delivered by the Scottish Association for Mental Health.

What Training and Capacity Building is available?

Healthy Minds Awareness Raising

Healthy Minds is an awareness-raising resource that supports the implementation of the NHSGGC Mental Health Improvement Frameworks. It aims to promote basic awareness and understanding of mental health and covers a variety of topics that can impact people’s mental health and wellbeing.

Online Learning

During these unprecedented times, the capacity to have face-to-face training is minimal. It is with this in mind that our team has collated a range of free online learning opportunities relating to Mental Health: Online Learning Opportunities.

Commissioned Programmes

We deliver a programme of learning opportunities to support increased knowledge and understanding of mental health alongside our partners, the Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH).

From August to September 2022 the following online learning sessions will be on offer; Please note all courses are free to attend and no cost is associated with it.

No.Courses August – September 2022
 1 Looking after Your Wellbeing
 2 Hybrid working
 3 Mental Health Supporting others
 4 Introduction to Suicide Prevention

Sessions are delivered via MS Teams and Zoom. The links on this page contain promotional flyers with information on each learning opportunity including learning outcomes, who can apply to attend, dates, and times. Sign up can be done via training@samh.org.uk

Sessions are open to anyone working/volunteering within the Greater Glasgow and Clyde area.

For further details, including dates and times:

Core Programme Flyer July-September 2022

Please contact the team at ggc.mhead@ggc.scot.nhs.uk if you have any questions about this program of learning. 

The Mental Health Improvement team supports colleagues and partners across the 6 local Health and Social Care Partnerships (HSCPs) that cover Greater Glasgow and Clyde. This includes Glasgow City, Renfrewshire, East Renfrewshire, West Dunbartonshire, East Dunbartonshire, and Inverclyde.

Our team helps partners and colleagues to prioritise, plan, and deliver on mental health improvement. We do this by addressing mental health improvement across the life course from perinatal, children and young people, adults and older adults. We use our evidence-based mental health improvement and early intervention frameworks to guide our work across the six HSCP areas. 

Healthy Minds Network

Healthy Minds is our professional network for those working in, or interested in, mental health improvement and anti-stigma work across NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. The network meets quarterly, and members come from those with an interest or remit for mental health and wellbeing within NHSGGC. This includes Local Authorities, voluntary / third sector, local workplaces, and others.

Network Aims

  • Engage those with an interest or remit for mental health and wellbeing within NHSGGC, Local Authorities, voluntary / third sector, local workplaces, and others
  • Share best practice, information and disseminate evidence-based and evidence-informed practice
  • Provide an opportunity for seed funding for local initiatives (particularly anti-stigma related to mental ill health) and to identify other available funding sources
  • Provide opportunities for ‘joined up’ working on issues of local, regional and national interest

If you are interested in joining the network, please email us at ggc.mhead@ggc.scot.nhs.uk.

Headline Reports

Below you will find six-month snapshots of our work:

Team Headline Reports

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Team Headline Report – June 2022

Team Headline Report June 2022 NHSGGC Mental Health Improvement Team

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Team Headline Report – December 2021
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Team Headline Report – July 2021
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Team Headline Report – July 2020
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Team Headline Report – December 2020
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Team Headline Report – December 2019

    Who are we?

    Trevor Lakey - Health Improvement and Inequalities Manager (Mental Health, Alcohol and Drugs)
    Trevor Lakey – Health Improvement and Inequalities Manager (Mental Health, Alcohol and Drugs)
    Laura Andre - Health Improvement Senior (Mental Health, Digital)
    Laura Andre – Health Improvement Senior (Mental Health, Digital)
    Heather Sloan - Health Improvement (Mental Health)
    Heather Sloan – Health Improvement (Mental Health)
    Michelle Guthrie - Health Improvement Senior (Mental Health)
    Michelle Guthrie – Health Improvement Senior (Mental Health)

    Get in touch

    If you have any questions about our team or our work, please get in touch with us by emailing ggc.mhead@ggc.scot.nhs.uk.

    NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde have developed the Healthy Minds – Adult Mental Health Improvement and Early Intervention Framework, a tool to enable us to support colleagues across each of the six Health and Social Care Partnerships to effectively deliver mental health improvement for our adult population.

    For more information about some common mental health conditions and for self-management tips and advice, please visit the NHSGGC Heads Up website.

    Useful Information on the Framework

    Respond Better to Distress

    Unfortunately, some people can find it difficult to cope at times in their lives and may harm themselves or think of ending their life. We need to improve our responses to people in distress, both from services and the wider community, including action to prevent suicide and better support for people who self harm.

    There are a range of suicide prevention activities underway across Greater Glasgow and Clyde, coordinated via the Choose Life Programmes and at Board level.  

    Self Harm Forum

    The NHSGGC Self Harm Forum is a group of trainers who have completed the What’s the Harm: Self Harm Awareness and Skills Training Course and play a key role in building capacity across the board area to help standardise understanding of and responses to self harm when used as a coping strategy.

    Helpful resources

    Suicide Alert Resources: Resources developed in recognition of the current context of COVID-19 and its impact on the public in terms of possible increases in both mental health concerns and numbers of people experiencing increased distress and/or suicidal thoughts. These can be downloaded from our resources page.

    Healthy Minds Basic Mental Health (Adult): A session from our Healthy Minds Resource that aims to raise awareness of mental health, what can impact mental health, what to look out for if someone is struggling with their mental health, and what we can do to help protect and support mental health.

    Ask Tell, Save a Life: Every Life Matters: An animation developed by Public Health Scotland and NHS Education Scotland explores the issue of suicide, including statistics and facts about suicide in Scotland. It helps learners understand the signs that people may be thinking about suicide, and how and when to provide immediate help and support.

    Promote Wellbeing for People with Long Term Conditions

    Long-term conditions are defined as health conditions that last a year or longer, impact a person’s life, and may require ongoing care and support. People with long-term mental health problems have significantly poorer health outcomes with an up to a 20-year gap in life expectancy. Similarly, people with other long-term conditions are at higher risk of mental health difficulties.

    It is important to promote holistic health for people with long-term conditions (“healthy body, healthy mind”), promote recovery approaches, and social inclusion. It is also important to include a focus on carers’ wellbeing as part of this agenda.

    The Long Term Conditions session from our Healthy Minds Resource can help raise awareness of the impact that long-term conditions can have on mental health and explores strategies to help manage this.

    Helplines

    NHS Inform: provides information on a range of illnesses and conditions and helps people make informed choices about their health and wellbeing www.nhsinform.scot

    Diabetes Scotland: Call 0141 212 8710*, Monday–Friday, 9am–6pm or email helpline.scotland@diabetes.org.uk Confidential helpline (charges apply) that can provide information about the condition and take time to talk through and explore emotional, social, psychological or practical difficulties.

    Asthma UK: Speak to an asthma expert nurse on their helpline 0300 222 5800 and/or website www.asthma.org.uk

    Epilepsy Scotland: provide a free confidential helpline that provides information and emotional support to anyone affected by epilepsy. Call 0808 800 2200, Mon-Fri 9.30am -4.30pm. Website hosts a range of information and resources www.epilepsyscotland.org.uk

    British Heart Foundation: website which hosts a section on emotional support and wellbeing www.bhf.org.uk

    British Lung Foundation: helpline available 03000 030 555, Mon – Fri 9am – 5pm calls cost as local call. Website www.blf.org.uk also provides a range of information.

    Anxiety and Stress Disorders: NHS Living Life provides a free telephone based service for people over the age of 16 feeling low, anxious or stressed. Call 0800 328 9655 lines opened Mon-Fri 1pm -9pm.

    Promote Wellbeing and Resilience with People & Communities

    Being socially connected and resilient, both as individuals and communities, are now recognised to be powerful influences on mental health and wider wellbeing. This can be achieved through developing social connections, tackling isolation, building resilience, strengthening the use of community assets (including social prescribing), and strengthening self-care and peer support.

    There is a wealth of initiatives happening across communities to help social connection and reduce loneliness and isolation. The Glasgow City Thriving Places is an example of how communities are bringing people together with a focus on delivering local services, making the best use of the local community assets, and improving quality of life.

    Helpful resources

    Healthy Minds Loneliness and Isolation: The Loneliness and Isolation session from our Healthy Minds Resource aims to raise awareness of loneliness and isolation, their impact on mental health and what can be done to help tackle it.

    Campaign to End Loneliness in Scotland: provides information and resources to help combat loneliness and isolation.

    Promote Wellbeing and Resilience at Work

    Workplaces have a key role to play in improving our nation’s health and quality of life. Good quality work represents an important force in promoting positive mental health, while unemployment and poor quality work are toxic influences.

    The business case for supporting the mental health and wellbeing of employees is a strong one. The benefits include:

    • Fewer days lost to sickness and absence
    • Staff retention and lower staff turnover
    • Improved productivity
    • Improved team working and staff morale

    Healthy Working Lives is for employers in Scotland looking for workplace health, safety, and wellbeing information. This includes information on supporting the mental health and wellbeing of employees, what they can do, and access to resources to help with this.

    Promote Positive Attitudes, Challenge Stigma and Discrimination

    Despite supportive policy within Scotland, the experience of people with mental health issues in our communities remains poor. Mental health-related stigma and discrimination does not only occur within health and social care, but also within financial inclusion, employability, and education. This is in the context of the social determinants of health and equality issues predominantly amongst those with protected characteristics.

    In Scotland, 35% of people have said that they, or someone close to them, have experienced stigma and discrimination due to their mental health. In addition, 1 in 3 young people in every classroom will experience a mental health problem, and 3 in 4 say that they fear the reaction of their friends.

    The impact of stigma and discrimination can be wide-ranging, including making someone’s mental health problems worse and stopping them from getting support. Recently, the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of our communities has raised awareness of these issues, and provided momentum for innovative action.

    Helpful resources

    To find out more about stigma and discrimination, you can access our Healthy Minds awareness-raising resource.

    See Me have a range of tools and resources for tackling mental health stigma.

    Tackle Underlying Determinants and Promote Equity

    Address underlying determinants of good mental health, including financial inclusion, nurturing early years, healthy environments, active citizenship and participation, and ensure focus on promoting wellbeing of diverse communities.

    Improving children and young people’s mental health is a national priority action area evidenced with the publication of several key policy documents including the 10 Year Mental Health Strategy for Scotland, Children and Young People’s Mental Health Task Force: Recommendations and more recently the Greater Glasgow and Clyde 5 year Mental Health Strategy.

    Early Intervention Framework

    NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde have developed a Child and Youth Mental Health Improvement and Early Intervention Framework, a tool to enable us to support colleagues across each of the six Health and Social Care Partnerships to effectively deliver mental health improvement for our child and youth population.

    Evidence demonstrates that there is no single intervention, therapy or programme that delivers mental well-being at a population level. Rather that young people require a number of prerequisites to develop resiliently and that these prerequisites span the school, family and community life of young people.

    The strategy encompasses six key elements to support children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing. A range of programmes and initiatives are in place to support the framework in addition to capacity building and resource development.

    Useful Information on the Framework

    One Good Adult

    The concept of ‘One Good Adult’ is to emphasise the importance of a dependable adult who can support and protect the mental wellbeing of a child and/or a young person. The presence of One Good Adult has been found to be a key indicator of how well a young person copes with their struggles. Although it’s important for young people to have One Good Adult, it is equally important to be that One Good Adult.

    One of the most interesting pieces of Irish research was the ‘My World Survey’ a national study of youth mental health in Ireland, which revealed a number of findings about the real mental health needs of young people. The report promotes the concept of the ‘One Good Adult’; this is seen as important to the mental wellbeing of young people. Over 70% of young people reported that they received very high or high support from a special adult. The study strongly confirms that the presence of ‘One Good Adult’ is important to the mental health of young people. It has a positive impact on their self-belief, confidence, coping skills and optimism about the future. This ‘One Good Adult’ can be a parent, grandparent, teacher, sports coach or someone who is available to them in times of need.

    The One Good Adult session from our Healthy Minds Resource can help raise awareness of the concept and what is means to be that one good adult.

    The Resilience Toolkit contains a One Good Adult activity session for children and young people, to help them identify the qualities a one good adult should have and who theirs might be.

    Resilience Development in Schools

    Schools play a key role in protecting and supporting the mental health of children and young people. A whole school approach to mental health and wellbeing can help children and young people develop the knowledge, understanding, skills and attributes they need for mental, emotional, social and physical wellbeing for now and in the future.

    A whole school approach makes mental health everyone’s business and in doing so helps to eliminate stigma and discrimination and create a more understanding school community and society which values mental health equally alongside physical health.

    Mental health and wellbeing should be embedded into all aspects of school life from Improvement Plans to the curriculum, consideration of the physical environment, ethos, resources, facilities, and its partnership working to enhance and extend expertise in the area of mental health and wellbeing.

    Mental Health Resources 

    Mental Health Planning Tools: A range of tools to help your school plan for mental health and wellbeing.  

    Online Mental Health Activities: A selection of online mental health-themed sessions developed for education staff and partners supporting young people during COVID-19. Suggested home schooling activities are also included for parents and care givers.

    Healthy Minds Resilience Session: The Resilience session from our Healthy Minds Resource can help raise awareness of what resilience is, what it means to be resilient, the benefits to mental health and what we can do to help develop resilience.

    Resilience Poster: A poster that includes top 10 tips for developing resilience.

    Resilience Development in Communities

    Many children and young people have links to their communities and opportunities to be involved in various youth groups and clubs. Youth services, voluntary and community organisations are in a very good position to support the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people.  For some children and young people they are more accessible than traditional statutory services, often reach the most vulnerable children and young people at risk of poorer mental health and many activities undertaken by community organisations already help support and improve mental health and wellbeing. 

    It is important that youth services, voluntary and community organisations have access to mental health resources and have a baseline knowledge and understanding of mental health and feel confident to intervene to help children and young people in situations of distress, including self harm and suicide. 

    Helpful Resources 

    The Resilience session from our Healthy Minds Resource can help raise awareness of what resilience is, what it means to be resilient, the benefits to mental health, and what we can do to help develop resilience.

    We have also developed a Resilience Top 10 Tips poster.  

    Guiding Through the Service Maze

    For children and young people mental health problems can develop as a result of life circumstances like exam stress, transitions, caring responsibilities, relationships, sexual identity, poverty, unemployment, grief, illness and long term conditions and family imprisonment. Many of these mental health problems are mild and temporary and often manageable with help from supportive trusted adults like teachers, youth workers, parents/caregivers and peer groups. The problems pass as the child or young person moves on and finds new solutions. However, some children and young people may require support from an organisation who specialises in the area that is impacting on their mental health, such as bereavement.

    It is important that children, families and young people have range of support options for early intervention and can be helped to find their way to appropriate help quickly. Here are some Children and Young People Mental Health Supports available to access.

    Still concerned?

    For some children and young people they may be finding it difficult to cope and may think of ending their life, if you are concerned about a child or young person’s mental health and wellbeing and feel they may be in distress, their Doctor should be their first point of contact. If you feel the young person’s life in immediate danger please call 999 for assistance.

    Responding to Distress

    Unfortunately, some children and young people can find it difficult to cope at times in their lives. As a result, they may harm themself or think of ending their life. It is therefore important that frontline staff working with children and young people are confident and supported to intervene and help children and young people in situations of distress, including self-harm and risk of suicide.

    Self-Harm Forum

    The NHSGG&C Self-Harm Forum is a group of trainers who have completed the What’s the Harm: Self-Harm Awareness and Skills Training Course and play a key role in building capacity across the board area to help standardise understanding of and responses to self harm when used as a coping strategy.

    Helpful Resources 

    Knowledge and Skills Framework: A whole school approach to self-harm awareness is a tool to support schools to consider how they may implement a whole school approach to self-harm awareness and training.

    Promoting Children and Young People’s Mental Health and preventing Self-Harm and Suicide : A series of animations co-produced by NHS Education for Scotland and Public Health Scotland. Developed to support the knowledge and skills of those in health, social care, and the wider public sectors who need to be informed about mental health, self-harm, and suicide prevention in relation to children and young people.

    Child and Youth Mental Health Supports: A range of useful mental health and wellbeing helplines and websites.

    Peer Help and Social Media

    Love it or loathe it – digital and social media is here to stay. In less than a lifetime, digital devices and the internet have infiltrated every corner of our lives. Digital is the medium by which most young people conduct their lives, with 99% of 12-25 year olds spending more than an hour a day on their smartphones and online.

    These young people don’t see a distinction between their online and offline lives. They are familiar with digital tools and know their way around them. In addition, some of the characteristics of the online world – anonymity and privacy – make it easier to talk about sensitive, potentially embarrassing subjects like their own mental health.

    Aye Mind: Supporting Youth Professionals to Embrace Digital Tools

    As staff who support young people, we have a duty to recognise how they use digital media in order to support them to make safe and informative choices.

    To support professionals with this, as part of our Aye Mind Project, we developed a toolkit to help support staff working with young people to support their mental health and wellbeing. This toolkit includes practical information, case studies, online resources, and reflection material for anyone interested in learning more about digital technology, health, and wellbeing.

    In addition to the toolkit, there is a wide range of tools and resources including signposting to websites and apps. Incorporating digital supports such as Apps, webinars, and online stress control classes into our daily self-care routine will help us in these challenging times. The website also provides information for things to consider before you start using digital tools. 

    Our Child and Youth Mental Health Policy Landscape illustrates how our evidence-based child and youth mental health improvement prevention and early intervention framework links to some of the key policy drivers for child and youth mental health and how they interconnect to ultimately Get it Right for Every Child.

    We have developed a range of free mental health resources and planning tools that are available for use. We also share monthly mental health snippets that feature a range of information across the life course; from resources, research articles, reports, events, and learning opportunities.

    We will continue to add to this page – please contact us at ggc.mhead@ggc.scot.nhs.uk if you have any questions or would like to make a suggestion. 

    Planning Tools and Snippets

    Planning Tools

    Listed below are a range of planning tools across the life course to assist with planning and prioritising mental health improvement. 

    Children and Young People’s Mental Health

    NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Child and Youth Prevention and Early Intervention Framework: An evidence-based framework to support partners and organisations plan and prioritise for child and youth mental health improvement.

    Child and Youth Mental Health Policy Landscape: A policy landscape to highlight how our evidence-based child and youth mental health improvement prevention and early intervention framework links to some of the key policy drivers for child and youth mental health and how they interconnect to ultimately Get it Right for Every Child.

    A Knowledge and Skills Framework: A Whole School Approach to Self-Harm Awareness and Training: A tool that has been structured to reflect national training frameworks. It has been developed to support schools to consider how they may implement a whole school approach to self harm awareness and training.

    Adult Mental Health 

    Healthy Minds: A strategic framework for promoting mental health in adults in Greater Glasgow and Clyde.

    Adult Mental Health Policy Landscape: A policy landscape to highlight how our evidence-based mental health improvement framework links to and supports some of the key adult mental health policy drivers.

    Mental Health Snippets

    Our team produces and circulates a monthly mental health snippet that provides a range of information across the life course, including resources, research articles, reports, events, and learning opportunities. If you would like to sign up for our snippet, please contact michelle.guthrie@ggc.scot.nhs.uk

    August 2022 (Mental Health and Inequalities)

    June 2022 (Infant Mental Health)

    April 2022 (Loneliness and Mental Health)

    March 2022 (Children and Young People)

    March 2022 (Special Edition – Sleep and Mental Health)

    February 2022 (Money and Mental Health)

    January 2022 (Mental Health Information & Support across the Life Course)

    November 2021 (Climate Change)

    October 2021 (Mental Health Information & Support across the Life Course)

    September 2021 (Suicide Prevention)

    August 2021 (Food & Mood / Mental Health Information & Support across the Life Course)

    July 2021 (Mental Health Awareness Days)

    June 2021 (Mental Health Awareness Days)

    May 2021 (Mental Health and Nature)

    April 2021 (Mental Health Information & Support across the Life Course)

    Resources

    We have developed a range of free resources across the life course that are available for use.

    We will continue to add to this page – please contact us at ggc.mhead@ggc.scot.nhs.uk if you have any questions or would like to make a suggestion.

    Accessing Mental Health Support

    We have created two resources illustrating the different ways in which mental health supports can be accessed; from 1 to 1 support, reading, group work, phone and online. The resources allow anyone working with children and young people and adults to populate with their own update to date information on an ongoing basis, relevant to their organisation, locality area and wider. These are reusable, wipe clean resources, and can be downloaded below.

    Accessing Mental Health Support Posters 

    Child and Youth Poster

    Adult Poster

    COVID-19: Mental Health Resources

    Public Mental Health Response in Greater Glasgow and Clyde during the COVID-19 Pandemic

    We have developed a paper that proposes an approach to co-ordinating the public mental health response to the COVID-19 pandemic within Greater Glasgow and Clyde. It recognises and aims to build on the tremendous response to the current and anticipated mental health needs of our population as a result of the pandemic.

    Resources

    In response to the current COVID-19 outbreak, the Mental Health Improvement Team have co-ordinated and developed a range of resources and information documents to support mental health and wellbeing across the life course.  Themes include responding to distress, loss and grief, long term conditions and sleep. We will also be sharing resources from partners and organisations during this time and will keep this page updated with resources as they become available. 

    General Mental Health and Wellbeing

    Bullying

    Carers

    Children and Young People

    Domestic Abuse 

    Parental Mental Health

    Sleep

    Loss and Grief 

    Long Term Health Conditions

    Responding to Distress 

    Below is a suite of resources that have been developed in recognition of the current context of Covid -19 and its impact on the public in terms of possible increases in both mental health concerns and numbers of people experiencing increased distress and/or suicidal thoughts. The resources comprise of a leaflet and poster aimed at the public and an ‘ALERT’ pathway briefing and prompt sheet for use by staff in health, social care and helpline situations. To accompany this there is also a resource directory of mental health support organisations for use by aforementioned staff.

    Online Training Opportunities

    During these unprecedented times the capacity to have face to face training is minimal. It is with this in mind have collated a range of free online learning opportunities relating to Mental Health, which have been laid out in a life course approach.

    Healthy Minds Pocket Guide

    Our Healthy Minds Pocket Guide provides details for a mental health support organisation in each of the 6 Health and Social Care Partnerships; Glasgow City, Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, East Renfrewshire, East Dunbartonshire and West Dunbartonshire. It also provides helpful tips for looking after your mental health and wellbeing and who to contact if you feel someone is in distress.

    Loss and Bereavement

    Below is a range of different resources related to loss and bereavement:

    Whole School Approach to Loss and Bereavement: This guidance aims to support practitioners to increase their knowledge and understanding on the subject of bereavement, loss, and change and how to support children and young people through this.

    CYP MH Framework Loss and Bereavement: This maps the bereavement guidance to the NHSGGC Child and Youth Mental Health Improvement and Early Intervention Framework.

    When People Die – Stories from Young People: A comic that tells numerous stories about death and resilience from a group of young people. The comic helps readers gain a different perspective on grief and what grieving means for young people.

    Supporting Those Affected by Bereavement: A staff guide that provides information, resources, and signposts to organisations who offer support to those struggling with grief as a result of bereavement. *Developed for Primary Care Staff working in GP practices across Glasgow City, however, contains lots of useful information and resources for anyone supporting those affected by bereavement*

    Grief After A Bereavement: A poster resource sharing information on healthy ways in which we can manage our grief. Available to download in various languages, including:

    Arabic

    Cantonese

    Farsi

    Kurdish Sorani

    Mandarin

    Polish

    Punjabi

    Romanian

    Slovak

    Urdu

    Resilience Toolkit

    The Resilience Toolkit and top ten tips for resilience poster provide a visual aid and practical guidance for promoting the resilience of children and young people. The resource includes interactive sessions and is designed to be used by workers and volunteers working with young people aged 10 and over.

    Resources 

    Top 10 Tips: downloadable, easy to follow tips.

    Resilience Toolkit: offers a range of activities including 5 minute icebreakers.

    CYP MH Framework Resilience Toolkit: maps the Resilience Toolkit to the NHSGGC Child and Youth Mental Health Improvement and Early Intervention Framework.

    Our Top Tips for Resilience Poster is available to download in 10 languages, including:

    Arabic

    Farsi

    Kurdish Sorani

    Polish

    Punjabi

    Romanian

    Simplified Chinese

    Slovak

    Traditional Chinese

    Urdu

    Resources for Schools and Youth Organisations

    Below is a variety of helpful mental health resources for schools and youth organisations: 

    Mental Health Resources for Schools and Youth Organisations

    A whole school approach to self-harm awareness and training: a resource structured to reflect national training frameworks such as the NHS Education for Scotland Perinatal Mental Health Curricular and Transforming Psychological Trauma Knowledge Frameworks. It has been developed to support Education Authorities and Schools to consider how they may implement a whole organisation approach to self-harm awareness and training. The document refers to self harm when used as a coping strategy, a response to distress where the individual has no intention to take their own life.

    Resources for Schools and Youth Organisations is a comprehensive document that offers a range of suggested resources that can be used in schools to help protect, promote and support the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people. Whilst this is not an exhaustive list, the resources highlighted have been developed by Education and Health colleagues and National Mental Health organisations.

    Mental Health Activities (Online)

    Online Mental Health Activities is a selection of online mental health-themed sessions developed for education staff and partners supporting young people during COVID-19. Suggested homeschooling activities are also included for parents and caregivers.

    Positive Mental Attitudes 

    Positive Mental Attitudes Curriculum pack has been developed to support teachers and practitioners to engage with young people about mental health issues. The lessons can be used individually and put together to provide a whole school approach to mental health education. Although the pack is several years old, much of the information is still relevant. A supporting addendum has been produced to include up to date information and signposting to new media resources. To access the supporting addendum click here.

    CYP MH Framework and PMA: maps the Positive Mental Attitudes Resource to the NHSGGC Child and Youth Mental Health Improvement Prevention and Early Intervention Framework.

    Mental Health Awareness-Raising

    Basic Mental Health Session & PowerPoint

    Loss and Grief Session & PowerPoint

    Sleep Session & PowerPoint

    One Good Adult Session & PowerPoint

    On Edge Self Harm Awareness Resource Pack

    Important Information

    We have updated some of the information within the On Edge: Learning About Self Harm resource pack. The pack can be used with upper primary aged children onwards.

    We have included three supporting documents which includes an information sheet to highlight what has been updated and two appendices:

    Appendix 1: Policy context to illustrate On Edge links to some of the key health, education and youth work policy drivers

    Appendix 2: A mental health resources handout which gives information on a range of additional resources that can support child and youth mental health improvement activity.

    Updated Info

    Appendix 1

    Appendix 2

    CYP MH Framework On Edge: maps On Edge Learning About Self-Harm Resource to the NHSGGC Child and Youth Mental Health Improvement and Early Intervention Framework.

    Self-Harm Information for Parents and Carers

    Self-harm among young people is a significant and growing public health problem. On average two teenagers in every secondary school classroom will have hurt themselves in response to the pressure of growing up in an increasingly complex and challenging world.

    The On Edge Self Harm Awareness Resource Pack is for teachers and professionals working with young people and has been developed in partnership with mental health and education professionals and funded by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. It includes teaching support materials and further information in the form of sign-posting to external resources and advice services, references and linked where relevant to the Curriculum for Excellence and other national guidance.

    It comprises four lesson plans to accompany the video links and is designed to give pupils a rounded view of self harm and the support available. Each lesson builds on the previous one. To achieve the best results they are best delivered in the correct order within a four week period.

    On Edge: Dean’s Story

    On edge. Learning about self-harm. Dean’s Story from IRISS-Mindreel on Vimeo.

    Lesson Plans to support this video via MindReel.

    On Edge: Millie’s story

    Lesson Plans to support this video via MindReel.

    Transforming Mental Health Resources

    We have developed the ‘Transforming Mental Health Resources’ to support the implementation of the NHSGGC Mental Health Improvement and Early Intervention Frameworks for adults and children and young people.

    The resources illustrate what the frameworks can look like in action to encourage partners from across sectors to utilise these tools when planning for mental health improvement. They provide information on a range of mental health issues from depression, suicide, self harm, body image, and loss, and grief as well as including a Top Ten Tips for Resilience poster. 

    Child and Youth

    Adult

    Nature and Mental Health

    Nature can be found all around us, from local parks and gardens, to lochs, forests and oceans. Aspects of modern life, however, mean that people are having less contact with nature. This is often due to increased time spent indoors on screens, and decreased outdoor recreation activities. It’s also because the environments around us, like our schools or workplaces, don’t tend to encourage contact with nature.

    Research shows that having access to green spaces is linked to a reduced risk of mental health difficulties, improved mood and increased life-satisfaction. Being outside in nature has other benefits too, like improved concentration, reduced stress, increased physical activity and better overall health.

    Our ‘Green Spaces of Greater Glasgow and Clyde’ resource highlights the local green spaces across the area and provides tips and resources on boosting wellbeing by being out in nature.

    Climate Change and Mental Health

    Climate change and mental health are two of the most significant and pressing challenges that we all face today. The two are also linked in more ways than many of us may realise, with climate change negatively affecting the mental health and emotional wellbeing of people around the world. According to a recent survey by the Royal College of Psychiatrists, 60% of respondents said that climate and ecological emergencies affect their mental health. Without intervention, these impacts will likely get worse.

    In November 2021, we held an event, ‘Our World, Our Wellbeing’, to look at the impact of climate change on mental health, how we can best support people through these anxious times, and what steps we can take to look after both our world and our wellbeing.

    A summary of the event, useful resources, and available climate-change specific support can be downloaded below:

    Our World, Our Wellbeing Event Report

    Mental Health in an Equal World

    The theme for World Mental Health Day 2021 was mental health in an unequal world. It was chosen to highlight the range of inequalities that people around the world experience – inequalities that can have a real impact on people’s mental health. 

    To mark the day, we wanted to imagine a world in which everyone has an equal opportunity to live well and experience good mental health, without stigma and discrimination. So we asked people to join us in creating a shared vision for mental health in an equal world. 

    Through a survey that was shared with the general public and professionals across our networks, we gathered your views on what this could look like, and how we can get there.

    Our two part series, In An Equal World, shares this vision.

    Part One: What could mental health in an equal world look like?

    Part Two: What can we all do to make that world a reality?